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AMC Residents win Goldie Brangman Award for 2022

Chris Erlichman, BSN, RN and Yanet Segura, BSN, RN receive the 2022 Goldie Brangman Award

Goldie Brangman, CRNA, MEd, MBA was an accomplished CRNA and exceptional mentor. Goldie served as the first and only African American President of the American Association of Nurse Anesthesiology and President of NYSANA from 1960 - 1961. She famously treated Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., after a near-fatal assassination attempt in 1958.

Every year at the Annual Fall Meeting the Goldie Brangman Award winner is announced. This year, two nurse anesthesia residents were named for their outstanding research and demonstrated work.

Chris Erlichman, BSN, RN and Yanet Segura, BSN, RN (Albany Medical College of Nurse Anesthesia) were recognized for their presentation on Evaluating Analgesic and Pulmonary Outcomes of Ultrasound-Guided Thoracic Fascial Plane Blocks as an Early Intervention in Multiple-Rib Fractures.

Read below to learn more about Chris and Yanet, their research and what it means to be named recipients.

Why is it important to be NYSANA members?

Yanet: Being NYSANA members can only solidify our induction into the profession that has provided anesthesia in the United States for over 150 years. As residents of New York State (the ONLY state remaining without a CRNA scope of practice bill), it is so imperative that we are part of this professional organization. As we fight for recognition, we aim to communicate how vital [CRNAs] are to patients and the country's healthcare system. We owe it to the future of nurse anesthesiology, a career we vigorously fought to join.  

Why does evaluating Analgesic and Pulmonary Outcomes of Ultrasound-Guided Thoracic Fascial Plane Blocks as an Early Intervention in Multiple-Rib Fractures interest or excite you?

Chris: As Trauma ICU nurses, we saw patients with multiple-rib fractures that could have benefited tremendously from regional anesthesia and analgesia. Implementing the latest techniques to combat pain, especially in those with chest trauma, is crucial to improving patient outcomes. We firmly believe many patients go without these services because of a lack of familiarity among those taking care of them daily. There should be a more diligent push to include anesthesia experts’ input wherever there is a conversation about pain management. Thus, as highly trained and skillful anesthesia providers, CRNAs should step up to the call. 

As we currently complete our education to become nurse anesthetists, we strive to practice to the full extent of our training, including using regional anesthesia for pain management across a broad patient population. Acknowledging this early on in our new career allows us to advance the profession, open the door for more jobs, and, most importantly, improve access to care for our patients.

What does it mean to you both to be awarded this recognition?

Yanet: As minority students who are both first-generation college graduates, we have a unique appreciation for this award. Ms. Brangman made considerable contributions to our profession, and we only hope to one day fill a small portion of her shoes. Here's to her providing the foundation while we stand on the shoulders of giants and try to contribute our piece to the history of nurse anesthesia.

What do you hope to gain from being members of NYSANA?

Chris: As students, we experienced and interacted with members of national and state organizations and saw firsthand how vital it is to the advancement of CRNAs. NYSANA provides the infrastructure needed for nurse anesthetists in New York to unite and protect this profession. We hope that with our active membership, we can tackle the challenges we face on our home turf.

President's address, September 2022

Stay up to date on the latest NYSANA news.

In this month's newsletter, NYSANA President, Giovanna Mahar, recaps her year and welcomes new President Sean McGarry

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NYSANA urges the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to create national standards of practice that will allow Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) to practice at the full extent of their training, education, and licensure.

As we take the time this month to honor the more than 892,000 veterans who live in New York State, it is important to remember that we owe America’s veterans far more than words of gratitude. They have earned the best, most timely healthcare—without long waits and red tape—through the Veterans Administration (VA). As President of the New York State Association of Nurse Anesthetists I urge the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to create national standards of practice that will allow Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) to practice at the full extent of their training, education, and licensure. Removing barriers so that advanced practice providers, including CRNAs, can practice to the top of the education and licensure is the right policy and honors those who have served our country.

This move will not only expand access to care for veterans but decrease wait times so that care can be delivered when they need it most, while decreasing the cost of that care for the VA.  In addition, it would allow the VA needed flexibility with rural facilities and providers working across state lines.

During the public health emergency caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the unique skills and expertise of CRNAs have allowed us to step forward in a way few others can, to treat veterans and others, leading the way in terms of advanced airway and ventilation management, which have been essential in addressing the deadliest part of this unforgiving virus.

To help meet the needs of veterans during the COVID-19 pandemic, the VA issued Directive 1899 in April 2020, which encouraged VA medical facilities to utilize VA healthcare professionals to practice and operate within the full scope of their license, registration or certification to increase veterans’ access to healthcare. It is now time to make that action permanent.

National standards of practice will allow all healthcare professionals working in the VA system to have consistent scope and requirements of practice, notwithstanding any state license, registration or other requirements. Since nearly one-third of all VA medical facilities have one or more sites of care in another state, and 14 percent of licensed healthcare professionals employed by the VA have a state license, registration or certification in another state than their main VA medical facility, having national standards of practice would allow these providers to care for veterans where and when they need it most.

In 2016, the United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reviewed a proposed rule to remove physician supervision requirements for advanced practice nurses (APNs), including CRNAs. The FTC praised the proposed rule as a way to increase the VA’s “ability to provide timely, efficient, and effective” care for our nation’s veterans and increase their access to needed healthcare and decrease wait times for patient appointments. The FTC noted theses changes in the VA would also benefit healthcare consumers in private markets.

Yet today, while all other types of APNs can practice to the full extent of their training, education, and licensure, CRNAs cannot. In fact, CRNAs are the only advanced practice nurses without full practice authority in the VA healthcare system.

This is despite the fact that the ability of CRNAs to provide high-quality care, even under the most difficult circumstances, has been recognized by every branch of the U.S. military. CRNAs have full practice authority in the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force and are the predominant provider of anesthesia on forward surgical teams and in combat support hospitals, where 90 percent of forward surgical teams are staffed by CRNAs.

The current barrier to CRNA in the VA health system is an anti-competitive action recognized by the FTC, AMVETS, one of the largest veterans’ service organizations in the United States, and others. It is time to bust the healthcare monopoly within the VA and ensure our veterans have the care they need and deserve for their sacrifice and services.

Visit anesthesiafacts.com to ask New York State Congressional leaders to contact U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Secretary Denis McDonough in support of the VA’s effort to establish National Standards of Practice for Healthcare Professionals, and to support allowing CRNAs to practice to the full extent of their education and training.

 

CRNAs provide critical service to the military and veterans

CRNAs are the primary providers of anesthesia care to U.S military personnel and our nation’s veterans. We thank these CRNAs for their critical service.

Nurses first provided anesthesia on the battlefields of the American Civil War. During World War I, nurse anesthetists became the predominant providers of anesthesia care to wounded soldiers on the front lines. Today, CRNAs have full practice authority in every branch of the military and are the primary providers of anesthesia care to U.S. military personnel on front lines, navy ships, and aircraft evacuation teams around the globe.

Learn more here.